Gentrification eats away at shelter options for domestic-abuse victims

The District’s booming housing market is shrinking the number of apartments and shelter beds available for victims of domestic violence, even as the number of city residents needing such shelter continues to rise, advocates say.

The rising cost of housing and a loss of private money means nonprofits can subsidize the rent for fewer than 20 abuse victims a year, down from 45 apartment subsidies two years ago. At the same time, the District’s only short-term crisis shelter for abuse victims and their families has shrunk from 22 apartments to 18, and the shelter must relocate because those units are being put on the market come fall.

The scarcity of housing, advocates say, means domestic-violence victims sometimes stay with their abusers rather than impose on friends and family or escape to a homeless shelter or the streets.

“When we ask survivors why they had to stay, one of

... read more at: https://www.washingtonpost.com/local/dc-politics/gentrification-eats-away-at-shelter-options-for-domestic-abuse-victims/2016/07/10/0470d18c-43c0-11e6-8856-f26de2537a9d_story.html

A Week of Gun Violence Does Nothing to Change the NRA’s Message

* And Tarantino, in suggesting that the category of film composition was a ghetto, was using a common dictionary definition: “something that resembles the restriction or isolation of a city ghetto.” But “ghetto” is also an idiomatic way of dismissing something as cheap or trashy. And the adjectival “ghetto” owes its salience to the fact that a modern American ghetto is not only poor but disproportionately African-American. Recent census data showed that 2.5 million whites live in high-poverty neighborhoods, compared with five million African-Americans. Earlier this year, Senator Bernie Sanders went further, saying, “When you’re white, you don’t know what it’s like to be living in a ghetto.”

What is a ghetto, really—and who lives there? In “Dark Ghetto,” a pioneering 1965 sociological study, Kenneth Clark depicted Harlem, a paradigmatic ghetto, as a “colony of New York City,” defined by both its economic dependence and its segregation.

... read more at: http://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2016/07/11/is-gentrification-really-a-problem

“Mike and Dave Need Wedding Dates” and the Death of the Hollywood Comedy

* And Tarantino, in suggesting that the category of film composition was a ghetto, was using a common dictionary definition: “something that resembles the restriction or isolation of a city ghetto.” But “ghetto” is also an idiomatic way of dismissing something as cheap or trashy. And the adjectival “ghetto” owes its salience to the fact that a modern American ghetto is not only poor but disproportionately African-American. Recent census data showed that 2.5 million whites live in high-poverty neighborhoods, compared with five million African-Americans. Earlier this year, Senator Bernie Sanders went further, saying, “When you’re white, you don’t know what it’s like to be living in a ghetto.”

What is a ghetto, really—and who lives there? In “Dark Ghetto,” a pioneering 1965 sociological study, Kenneth Clark depicted Harlem, a paradigmatic ghetto, as a “colony of New York City,” defined by both its economic dependence and its segregation.

... read more at: http://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2016/07/11/is-gentrification-really-a-problem

Seattle’s devilish new home price record: $666000

As home prices and rents continue to soar faster in the Seattle area than just about anywhere else in the nation, the city has set a new all-time high for housing costs.

The median Seattle single-family home cost $666,500 in June, easily beating out the old record set in February, according to figures released Wednesday by the Northwest Multiple Listing Service. Seattle home prices have risen 15.9 percent just in the past year and an astounding 74 percent in the last five years.

Looking across the broader area, King County set a new home price record for the fifth straight month, clocking in at $573,500 for June. That’s up 14.7 percent from a year ago and 66 percent in the last five years.

The biggest driver of home

... read more at: http://www.seattletimes.com/business/seattles-devilish-new-home-price-record-666000/

How I bought a condo in San Francisco for $268000

SAN FRANCISCO (MarketWatch) — San Francisco is America’s poster child for unaffordable city living: The median value of homes rocketed from $670,000 in 2012 to $1.13 million this May.

But I bought a brand-new, one-bedroom condo in the heart of the Mid-Market District, right around the corner from Twitter’s headquarters, for just $268,000.

I’m living proof that it’s possible to buy a home in San Francisco even if you’re not a millionaire.

Courtesy Sally French

... read more at: http://www.marketwatch.com/story/how-i-bought-a-condo-in-san-francisco-for-268000-2016-07-05

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At the Golden Globe Awards, in January, Ennio Morricone won Best Original Score for his contribution to “The Hateful Eight,” the Quentin Tarantino Western. Accepting the award on Morricone’s behalf was Tarantino himself, who brandished the trophy in a gesture of vindication, suggesting that Morricone, despite all the honors he has received, is nevertheless underrated. Tarantino proclaimed Morricone his favorite composer. “And when I say favorite composer,” he added, “I don’t mean movie composer—that ghetto. I’m talking about Mozart. I’m talking about Beethoven. I’m talking about Schubert.” The backlash began a few moments later, when the next presenter, Jamie Foxx, approached the microphone. He smiled, looked around, and shook his head slightly. “Ghetto,” he said.

Tarantino’s comment, and Foxx’s one-word response to it, became a big story. In the Washington Post, a television reporter called Tarantino’s “ghetto” comment a “tone-deaf

... read more at: http://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2016/07/11/is-gentrification-really-a-problem